Italian Stamps

Collector's Edition

Italy is famous for its tourist attractions that are mainly artistic architectures. The intricate beauty of these buildings reveals the history of the country’s art and architecture and the many layers of mysticism that lies beneath them.

Historically, almost all Italian designers have come from an architecture background or the art world. Italy has braced modernity through its complex and unique history, and for this reason it has never fully shared the modes and tempos of Great Britain, France, Germany, the United States and other industrialized nations.

In this sense, modernity in Italy has developed in a way we might call uncertain and imperfect. Italian artistic and design research should mediate between a desire to break with the burden of history and powerful attempts to establish a dialogue with it.

Keeping this in mind, with simple lines, patterns and minimal forms, I illustrated the interiors & entrance of the Florence Cathedral, the dome of Galleria Vittorio Emanuele, the dome of Saint Peter’s Basilica and the ceiling & the Peacock Room of Castle of Sammezzano. The final designs weaves the elaborate and distinct history of the nation with a touch of modernity.

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Initial illustrations of the dome of Galleria Vittorio Emanuele.
These custom illustrations were created in order to bring modernity to light in the historic environment of Italy.

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Galleria Vittorio Emanuele: The Dome
Milan, Italy
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The Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II is one of the world’s oldest shopping malls.
The octagonal space of the structure is topped with a glass dome. The Milanese Galleria was larger in scale than its predecessors and was an important step in the evolution of the modern glazed and enclosed shopping mall, of which it was the direct progenitor. The Galleria connects two of Milan’s most famous landmarks: The Duomo and the Teatro Alla Scala. The Galleria has emerged as a landmark in its own right.
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Florence Cathedral: Interior
Florence, Italy
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The Gothic interior of the Florence Cathedral showcases a vast and an empty impression. The relative bareness of the church corresponds with the austerity of religious life, as preached by Girolamo Savonarola. Many decorations in the church have been lost, or transferred to the Museum Opera del Duomo in the course of time, such as the magnificent cantorial pulpits (the singing galleries for the choristers) of Luca della Robbia and Donatello.
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Saint Peter’s Basilica: The Dome
Vatican City
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The dome of Saint Peter’s Basilica was designed by Michelangelo, who worked on the construction beginning in 1547. By the end of his life, construction had reached the drum of the dome, which alternates prominent double columns with gabled windows. After his death, Giacomo Della Porta, Michelangelo’s pupil, took over the direction of the work, raising the vault of the dome about 7 meters and completing it in 1590, in just 22 months, under the leadership of Pope Sixtus V.
The dome has a double calotte, with an inner diameter of 42.56 meters and it measures 136.57 meters from the base to the top of the cross. This dome was used as a model for other domes in the western world. Among such domes, although built according to different techniques, are those of Saint Paul’s in London, Les Invalides in Paris and the Capitol building in Washington, D.C., USA.

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Florence Cathedral: Main Portal
Florence, Italy
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The original main portal has three bronze doors dating from 1899 to 1903. The doors are adorned with scenes from the life of the Madonna. The mosaics in the lunettes above the doors were designed by Niccolò Barabino. The pediment above the central portal contains a half-relief designed by Tito Sarrocchi. On top of the façade is a series of niches with the twelve Apostles in the middle. Between the rose window and the tympanum, there is a gallery with busts of famous Florentine artists.
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Castle of Sammezzano: The Ceiling
Tuscany, Italy
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Sammezzano Castle was built in 1605 with funds from Spanish nobility for Ximenes of Aragon. Then it was inherited by Ferdinand Panciatichi Ximenes and re-designed between 1853 and 1889. Sammezzano Castle is created in the Moorish style, with intricate designs and a breathtaking assortment of patterns and colors. The castle has 365 rooms, one for every day of the year and each room has its own name and differs from the others.
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Castle of Sammezzano: The Peacock Room
Tuscany, Italy
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Within the castle is the Peacock Room with incredible colors and geometries. Above an archway the words “Non Plus Ultra” (meaning “nothing further beyond” in Latin), are inscribed. These words in Greek mythology was a warning that marked the edge of a flat world for explorers; perhaps communicating the architect’s vision to take visitors literally out of this world with jaw-dropping interiors.

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